ABCs of School Emergency Planning (resources for schools, educators + parents)

The following appeared in FEMA and Citizen Corps’ 4-Sep-2014 Individual and Community Preparedness e-Brief:

It’s September once again and that means children across the country are heading back to school.

Do you know the emergency plan at your child’s school? What about the steps the school will take to share pertinent information with you?

As a parent, it’s important to understand what will happen after a natural disaster or emergency at your child’s school.

Here are the ABC’s of what you should know about a school’s Emergency Operations Plan (EOP):

  1. Always ensure your school has up-to-date evacuation plans, emergency kits and contact sheets. Ensure your school’s nurse has your child’s medical information and medications on hand. Ask your child’s teacher to walk you through their evacuation plan and show you their emergency kits.
  2. Be Prepared. Provide your school with your cell phone number, work phone number, and contact information for your relatives. If your child is old enough to carry a cell phone, make sure they know how to text you or a designated contact in case of an emergency. Also, be prepared to have a conversation with your child about emergencies and hazards.
  3. Coordinate with your child’s teachers and school officials to set a plan in place if there is not one. Guide them to Ready.gov for more resources and encourage the school to perform school wide drills and exercises as part of America’s PrepareAthon!

These ABCs, tools and resources are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to your child’s at-school safety. For more information on how to get started visit www.ready.gov/school-emergency-plans

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One Response to ABCs of School Emergency Planning (resources for schools, educators + parents)

  1. Brian R. says:

    This is a great point that brings me back to childhood of sitting under my desk during drills. As a parent you don’t really know what they touch on at school these days in dealing with preparedness. This post is a great way to reduce worrying about your child if you can’t immediately pick them up.

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