Iceland’s Jolabokaflod (Christmas Book Flood) needs to become tradition in North America

November 27, 2017

Did you know in Iceland the best Christmas gift is a book? Icelanders have a wonderful tradition of giving books to each other on Christmas Eve and the custom is so deeply ingrained in their culture that it is the reason for the Jólabókaflóð, [pronounced yolabokaflot], also known as the “Christmas Book Flood”.

Jolabokaflod originated during World War II when foreign imports were restricted, but paper was cheap. According to Readitforward.com, Iceland’s population was not large enough to support a year-round publishing industry, so book publishers flooded the market with new titles in the final weeks of the year and citizens looked forward to perusing the book catalog similar to how kids look through toy catalogs.

Nowadays books are published and released throughout the year there, but many still continue the tradition of Jolabokaflod … and it is something we hope becomes popular in North America.

If you’d like to give the gift of preparedness this holiday season, our 266-page disaster preparedness and first aid paperback is discounted over 70% off list (or only $4.50 delivered in continental U.S.) on 10 copies or more.

And we customize books for free (even in small quantity) so you can personalize them with logos and special messages to employees, colleagues, customers, members, volunteers and local communities.

We also offer our 280-page PDF ebook for only $3.00 US (80% off list) and have a free 56-page portion of IT’S A DISASTER! that people can download and share with others.

The quick-reference easy to use manual provides instructional bullets in 2-color format with tips on what people need to think about and do before, during and after specific types of emergencies and disasters (including active shooter scenarios), as well as how to administer basic first aid.

Plus a portion of book sales benefit the U.S. First Responders Association so purchases not only help educate your loved ones and the public, but also supports our nation’s heroes.

Please share these ideas and links with others and let’s start doing this cool book giving tradition here in America! Stay safe, j & B

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Google SOS Alerts can help during an emergency or crisis

July 26, 2017

Google has announced a new set of features in Google Search and Maps called SOS Alerts that activate during major natural, man-made, or humanitarian disasters.

During a crisis, people need real-time information. Whether they’re experiencing an issue on the ground or trying to understand the situation from afar, Google wants their products to give people quick access to important information—such as what is going on and where it is happening—to help them stay safe and informed.

For people using Google Search to learn more about a crisis, SOS Alerts connects them with news, maps, and whenever available, updates from local authorities, emergency resources, donation opportunities, and more—all organized in one place for easy access and sharing.

For people using Maps to find out more about a crisis, SOS Alerts provide live updates about what’s going on in the area, as well as direct access to emergency resources, such as hotline numbers.

Google Public Alerts complement SOS Alerts by helping local and public authorities communicate emergency messages specifically related to official weather, public safety, and earthquake alerts.

The tech giant developed SOS Alerts in partnership with FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency), the Red Cross and local emergency authorities.

The below image is an example of what a Google search result might look like in an area dealing with wildfires:

Sources: Google Crisis Response, Google blog and NextGov

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CDC Blast Injury mobile application (free iPhone or iPad app for first responders)

April 29, 2017

The CDC Blast Injury app supports pre-hospital and hospital healthcare providers and public health professionals in preparing for and responding to terrorist bombings and other mass casualty explosive events.

Healthcare providers and public health professionals can use the application to:

  • Quickly review critical steps to take from the moment an event happens.
  • Learn blast injury patterns and treatment considerations.
  • Scan information efficiently with minimal effort on the way to or at a scene and grasp clinical guidance to support key job functions.
  • Access medical surge capacity guidance including information on facilitating health systems emergency communication.
  • Find special populations treatment considerations (e.g., women who are pregnant, children)
  • Link to the full breadth of CDC’s resources on blast injuries and mass casualty explosive events.

The CDC Blast Injury app for iPhone or iPad is available for free on iTunes


Cuteness overload (APHA Get Ready Calendar features baby animals)

April 11, 2017

If you haven’t seen APHA’s 2017 Get Ready Calendar, you need to get your free copy and share this with others!

The winning baby animals pics from APHA’s 2016 Get Ready Photo Contest are being used to promote and encourage preparedness, plus the calendar is so stinkin’ cute it will look great on your walls at home, work and school.

The above Awwwwwpocalypse kitty is the calendar’s cover and below are a few more “cuteness overload” examples…

 

 

 

 

Download and print your 2017 copy today or see more cute 2017 photos, and check out previous APHA calendars featuring cats, dogs, babies and other animals.

APHA’s Get Ready campaign helps Americans prepare themselves, their families and their communities for all disasters and hazards, including pandemic flu, infectious disease, natural disasters and other emergencies. Learn more at http://getreadyforflu.org or follow them on Twitter @GetReady


Inside a State Emergency Operations Center

April 9, 2017

Ever wonder what goes on behind the scenes during a disaster?

Minnesota Homeland Security and Emergency Management (HSEM) created a brief video of their State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) during a simulated activation that shows what staff do to coordinate the state’s response when an emergency situation occurs.

This video was the first in a series that highlights the different divisions within MN Department of Public Safety in case your agency or dept may want to do similar projects.  Find more DPS MIC’D UP videos on their MnDPS channel


ABCs of School Emergency Planning (resources for schools, educators + parents)

September 6, 2014

The following appeared in FEMA and Citizen Corps’ 4-Sep-2014 Individual and Community Preparedness e-Brief:

It’s September once again and that means children across the country are heading back to school.

Do you know the emergency plan at your child’s school? What about the steps the school will take to share pertinent information with you?

As a parent, it’s important to understand what will happen after a natural disaster or emergency at your child’s school.

Here are the ABC’s of what you should know about a school’s Emergency Operations Plan (EOP):

  1. Always ensure your school has up-to-date evacuation plans, emergency kits and contact sheets. Ensure your school’s nurse has your child’s medical information and medications on hand. Ask your child’s teacher to walk you through their evacuation plan and show you their emergency kits.
  2. Be Prepared. Provide your school with your cell phone number, work phone number, and contact information for your relatives. If your child is old enough to carry a cell phone, make sure they know how to text you or a designated contact in case of an emergency. Also, be prepared to have a conversation with your child about emergencies and hazards.
  3. Coordinate with your child’s teachers and school officials to set a plan in place if there is not one. Guide them to Ready.gov for more resources and encourage the school to perform school wide drills and exercises as part of America’s PrepareAthon!

These ABCs, tools and resources are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to your child’s at-school safety. For more information on how to get started visit www.ready.gov/school-emergency-plans


What are YOU gonna do about a household chemical emergency?

April 29, 2013

Today’s musing involves chemicals since they are all around us. Just take a moment to think about all the cleaners, chemicals and hazardous materials scattered throughout your home, garage and workshop.

Check for toxic products

When you have some time, snoop around your home and garage and read the labels on all products to ensure you are using, storing and disposing of the material according to the manufacturer’s directions. Many products like oil based paints (including stains, strippers and varnishes); household cleaners, automotive products, lighter fluid and other fuels, pesticides, fertilizers and other yard products contain hazardous components. They will be identified by such words as “warning, ” “danger,” “toxic,” “corrosive,” “irritant,” “flammable” or “caution” found on their labels.

It is critical to store household chemicals in places where children and pets cannot access them. Pay special to containers with the skull and crossbones which is used to indicate the presence of a poisonous chemical. If you see this symbol on a household product, pay attention to the warning. And remember products such as aerosol cans of hair spray and deodorant, nail polish and nail polish remover, toilet bowl cleaners and furniture polishes all fall into the category of hazardous materials too.

Did you know…

  • as many as 500,000 products pose physical or health hazards and can be defined as “hazardous materials” and over 1,000 new synthetic chemicals are introduced each year?!
  • the average U.S. household generates more than 20 pounds of household hazardous waste per year. As much as 100 pounds can accumulate in the home, often remaining there until the residents move out or do an extensive cleanout?! – EPA
  • more than 7 million accidental poisonings occur each year, with more than 75% involving children under age 6?! —The Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons
  • according to the U.S. Poison Control Centers, “A child is accidentally poisoned every 30 seconds at home…” —”Prosperity Without Pollution,” by Joel S. Hirschorn and Kirsten V. Oldenburg, 1991
  • of chemicals commonly found in homes, 150 have been linked to allergies, birth defects, cancer, and psychological abnormalities. — Consumer Product Safety Commission

BEFORE A HOUSEHOLD CHEMICAL EMERGENCY:

Learn risks – Call your local public health department or the Environmental Protection Agency for information about hazardous household materials. And check out the National Library of Medicine’s Household Products Database that provides information on over 12,000 common household products and their potential health effects at http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/

The database is designed to help answer the following typical questions and more:

  • What are the chemical ingredients and their percentage in specific brands?
  • Which products contain specific chemical ingredients?
  • Who manufactures a specific brand? How do I contact this manufacturer?
  • What are the acute and chronic effects of chemical ingredients in a specific brand?

Read labels – Always read product labels for proper use, safe storage and disposal of chemicals.

Don’t dump it – Many used or unwanted products dumped down the sink, poured down a storm drain, tossed in the trash or poured on the ground often wind up in nearby rivers, streams or ground water where they can be toxic to humans and aquatic life, even at low concentrations. And those products could disrupt your septic system or contaminate treatment plant sludge. Learn how to dispose of used liquids and containers in advance.

Recycle it? – Call your local recycling center or collection site to ask what chemicals can be recycled or dropped off for disposal — many centers take things like car batteries, oil, tires, paint or thinners, etc. And many communities setup household hazardous waste (HHW) collection programs throughout the year.

Store it – Keep all chemicals and household cleaners in safe, secure locations out of reach of small children.

Put it out – Don’t smoke while using household chemicals.

Consider using non-toxic solutions – Look for “green” and non-toxic products that say petroleum-free, biodegradable, septic safe, phosphate-free, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC)-free, and solvent-free. And find more resources below.

DURING A HOUSEHOLD CHEMICAL EMERGENCY:

Call for help – Call your local Poison Control Center (or 1-800-222-1222), 9-1-1, fire department, hospital or emergency medical services. If possible, have container handy since medical professionals may need specific data from label.

First aid tips – Follow instructions on label and be prepared to perform first aid on the victim (e.g. eye or body rinsing, rescue breathing (but have a mouth guard handy), open windows and move away from the scene if there’s a strong odor or vapors, etc.)

Things to watch for if a chemical is swallowed…

Burns on the mouth, tongue and lips
Stomach pains
Open cabinets; spilled or open containers
Difficulty breathing
Convulsions or seizures
Weakness or dizziness
Passed out

What to do…

  • Stay calm and find out exactly what, how much, and how long ago it was swallowed.
  • Call Poison Control Center (1-800-222-1222 in the U.S.) or an ambulance and have bottle or container handy (if possible).
  • NEVER give victim anything to eat or drink unless told to do so by Poison Control Center or a Medical professional!!
  • If victim pukes, lay them on their side to keep airway open. Save a sample of the vomit IF the poison is unknown so the hospital can try to identify it.
  • If victim isn’t breathing consider doing Rescue Breathing – but ONLY if sure poison cannot be spread person to person or if you have a mouth shield or mask to avoid cross contamination.

CPR mouth shield                 CPR mouth shield

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends parents no longer use syrup of ipecac (pronounced ip’- î – kak) as a poison treatment intervention in the home. Immediately contact local Poison Control Center for help.

If you decide to keep a few 1 ounce bottles in your First Aid Kit … use ONLY on the advice of a Medical professional or the Poison Control Center! Syrup of ipecac is sold by most pharmacies without a prescription and used to induce vomiting (makes you puke) — again, use only if instructed to do so.

Above extracted from IT’S A DISASTER! …and what are YOU gonna do about it? by Bill and Janet Liebsch

Clean naturally

There are tons of blogs and sites with tips on making non-toxic cleaners for your home so consider doing some research about using simple household products like baking soda, vinegar, liquid detergent, lemon juice, essential oils and other items to clean naturally … and save money!

For example, check out…

About.com Frugal Living 
Care2 Make a Difference
Non-Toxic.info 
OrganizedHome.com
SimpleHomemade.net 

Stay safe and have a great week! 🙂 j & B


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