CDC Blast Injury mobile application (free iPhone or iPad app for first responders)

April 29, 2017

The CDC Blast Injury app supports pre-hospital and hospital healthcare providers and public health professionals in preparing for and responding to terrorist bombings and other mass casualty explosive events.

Healthcare providers and public health professionals can use the application to:

  • Quickly review critical steps to take from the moment an event happens.
  • Learn blast injury patterns and treatment considerations.
  • Scan information efficiently with minimal effort on the way to or at a scene and grasp clinical guidance to support key job functions.
  • Access medical surge capacity guidance including information on facilitating health systems emergency communication.
  • Find special populations treatment considerations (e.g., women who are pregnant, children)
  • Link to the full breadth of CDC’s resources on blast injuries and mass casualty explosive events.

The CDC Blast Injury app for iPhone or iPad is available for free on iTunes


Cuteness overload (APHA Get Ready Calendar features baby animals)

April 11, 2017

If you haven’t seen APHA’s 2017 Get Ready Calendar, you need to get your free copy and share this with others!

The winning baby animals pics from APHA’s 2016 Get Ready Photo Contest are being used to promote and encourage preparedness, plus the calendar is so stinkin’ cute it will look great on your walls at home, work and school.

The above Awwwwwpocalypse kitty is the calendar’s cover and below are a few more “cuteness overload” examples…

 

 

 

 

Download and print your 2017 copy today or see more cute 2017 photos, and check out previous APHA calendars featuring cats, dogs, babies and other animals.

APHA’s Get Ready campaign helps Americans prepare themselves, their families and their communities for all disasters and hazards, including pandemic flu, infectious disease, natural disasters and other emergencies. Learn more at http://getreadyforflu.org or follow them on Twitter @GetReady


Inside a State Emergency Operations Center

April 9, 2017

Ever wonder what goes on behind the scenes during a disaster?

Minnesota Homeland Security and Emergency Management (HSEM) created a brief video of their State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) during a simulated activation that shows what staff do to coordinate the state’s response when an emergency situation occurs.

This video was the first in a series that highlights the different divisions within MN Department of Public Safety in case your agency or dept may want to do similar projects.  Find more DPS MIC’D UP videos on their MnDPS channel


ABCs of School Emergency Planning (resources for schools, educators + parents)

September 6, 2014

The following appeared in FEMA and Citizen Corps’ 4-Sep-2014 Individual and Community Preparedness e-Brief:

It’s September once again and that means children across the country are heading back to school.

Do you know the emergency plan at your child’s school? What about the steps the school will take to share pertinent information with you?

As a parent, it’s important to understand what will happen after a natural disaster or emergency at your child’s school.

Here are the ABC’s of what you should know about a school’s Emergency Operations Plan (EOP):

  1. Always ensure your school has up-to-date evacuation plans, emergency kits and contact sheets. Ensure your school’s nurse has your child’s medical information and medications on hand. Ask your child’s teacher to walk you through their evacuation plan and show you their emergency kits.
  2. Be Prepared. Provide your school with your cell phone number, work phone number, and contact information for your relatives. If your child is old enough to carry a cell phone, make sure they know how to text you or a designated contact in case of an emergency. Also, be prepared to have a conversation with your child about emergencies and hazards.
  3. Coordinate with your child’s teachers and school officials to set a plan in place if there is not one. Guide them to Ready.gov for more resources and encourage the school to perform school wide drills and exercises as part of America’s PrepareAthon!

These ABCs, tools and resources are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to your child’s at-school safety. For more information on how to get started visit www.ready.gov/school-emergency-plans


What are YOU gonna do about a household chemical emergency?

April 29, 2013

Today’s musing involves chemicals since they are all around us. Just take a moment to think about all the cleaners, chemicals and hazardous materials scattered throughout your home, garage and workshop.

Check for toxic products

When you have some time, snoop around your home and garage and read the labels on all products to ensure you are using, storing and disposing of the material according to the manufacturer’s directions. Many products like oil based paints (including stains, strippers and varnishes); household cleaners, automotive products, lighter fluid and other fuels, pesticides, fertilizers and other yard products contain hazardous components. They will be identified by such words as “warning, ” “danger,” “toxic,” “corrosive,” “irritant,” “flammable” or “caution” found on their labels.

It is critical to store household chemicals in places where children and pets cannot access them. Pay special to containers with the skull and crossbones which is used to indicate the presence of a poisonous chemical. If you see this symbol on a household product, pay attention to the warning. And remember products such as aerosol cans of hair spray and deodorant, nail polish and nail polish remover, toilet bowl cleaners and furniture polishes all fall into the category of hazardous materials too.

Did you know…

  • as many as 500,000 products pose physical or health hazards and can be defined as “hazardous materials” and over 1,000 new synthetic chemicals are introduced each year?!
  • the average U.S. household generates more than 20 pounds of household hazardous waste per year. As much as 100 pounds can accumulate in the home, often remaining there until the residents move out or do an extensive cleanout?! – EPA
  • more than 7 million accidental poisonings occur each year, with more than 75% involving children under age 6?! —The Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons
  • according to the U.S. Poison Control Centers, “A child is accidentally poisoned every 30 seconds at home…” —”Prosperity Without Pollution,” by Joel S. Hirschorn and Kirsten V. Oldenburg, 1991
  • of chemicals commonly found in homes, 150 have been linked to allergies, birth defects, cancer, and psychological abnormalities. — Consumer Product Safety Commission

BEFORE A HOUSEHOLD CHEMICAL EMERGENCY:

Learn risks – Call your local public health department or the Environmental Protection Agency for information about hazardous household materials. And check out the National Library of Medicine’s Household Products Database that provides information on over 12,000 common household products and their potential health effects at http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/

The database is designed to help answer the following typical questions and more:

  • What are the chemical ingredients and their percentage in specific brands?
  • Which products contain specific chemical ingredients?
  • Who manufactures a specific brand? How do I contact this manufacturer?
  • What are the acute and chronic effects of chemical ingredients in a specific brand?

Read labels – Always read product labels for proper use, safe storage and disposal of chemicals.

Don’t dump it – Many used or unwanted products dumped down the sink, poured down a storm drain, tossed in the trash or poured on the ground often wind up in nearby rivers, streams or ground water where they can be toxic to humans and aquatic life, even at low concentrations. And those products could disrupt your septic system or contaminate treatment plant sludge. Learn how to dispose of used liquids and containers in advance.

Recycle it? – Call your local recycling center or collection site to ask what chemicals can be recycled or dropped off for disposal — many centers take things like car batteries, oil, tires, paint or thinners, etc. And many communities setup household hazardous waste (HHW) collection programs throughout the year.

Store it – Keep all chemicals and household cleaners in safe, secure locations out of reach of small children.

Put it out – Don’t smoke while using household chemicals.

Consider using non-toxic solutions – Look for “green” and non-toxic products that say petroleum-free, biodegradable, septic safe, phosphate-free, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC)-free, and solvent-free. And find more resources below.

DURING A HOUSEHOLD CHEMICAL EMERGENCY:

Call for help – Call your local Poison Control Center (or 1-800-222-1222), 9-1-1, fire department, hospital or emergency medical services. If possible, have container handy since medical professionals may need specific data from label.

First aid tips – Follow instructions on label and be prepared to perform first aid on the victim (e.g. eye or body rinsing, rescue breathing (but have a mouth guard handy), open windows and move away from the scene if there’s a strong odor or vapors, etc.)

Things to watch for if a chemical is swallowed…

Burns on the mouth, tongue and lips
Stomach pains
Open cabinets; spilled or open containers
Difficulty breathing
Convulsions or seizures
Weakness or dizziness
Passed out

What to do…

  • Stay calm and find out exactly what, how much, and how long ago it was swallowed.
  • Call Poison Control Center (1-800-222-1222 in the U.S.) or an ambulance and have bottle or container handy (if possible).
  • NEVER give victim anything to eat or drink unless told to do so by Poison Control Center or a Medical professional!!
  • If victim pukes, lay them on their side to keep airway open. Save a sample of the vomit IF the poison is unknown so the hospital can try to identify it.
  • If victim isn’t breathing consider doing Rescue Breathing – but ONLY if sure poison cannot be spread person to person or if you have a mouth shield or mask to avoid cross contamination.

CPR mouth shield                 CPR mouth shield

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends parents no longer use syrup of ipecac (pronounced ip’- î – kak) as a poison treatment intervention in the home. Immediately contact local Poison Control Center for help.

If you decide to keep a few 1 ounce bottles in your First Aid Kit … use ONLY on the advice of a Medical professional or the Poison Control Center! Syrup of ipecac is sold by most pharmacies without a prescription and used to induce vomiting (makes you puke) — again, use only if instructed to do so.

Above extracted from IT’S A DISASTER! …and what are YOU gonna do about it? by Bill and Janet Liebsch

Clean naturally

There are tons of blogs and sites with tips on making non-toxic cleaners for your home so consider doing some research about using simple household products like baking soda, vinegar, liquid detergent, lemon juice, essential oils and other items to clean naturally … and save money!

For example, check out…

About.com Frugal Living 
Care2 Make a Difference
Non-Toxic.info 
OrganizedHome.com
SimpleHomemade.net 

Stay safe and have a great week! 🙂 j & B


Dealing with a crappy situation (sanitation tips during an emergency or disaster)

February 20, 2013

carnival trash cans for sanitationLast week the media reported ad nauseum about the stranded Carnival cruise ship that caused thousands of passengers to endure several days with little to no power or heat, no running water and very few working toilets.

Passengers said Triumph’s staff were handing out “poop bags” and telling people to “pee in the showers”.

Yes, it was a nasty situation for the folks stuck on the “floating petri dish”, but some of the headlines and bylines on photos ranged from dramatic to comical.

One described “trash cans and sinks of human waste, feces-smeared walls and mushy floors inside the ‘Hunger Games-like’ Carnival cruise ship”. Another was simply called “Holy Ship!”

red bags for sanitationAnd the UK’s Daily Mail described this red bag photo …

“Disgust: Guests were forced to defecate into plastic bags and place them outside their rooms after toilets on board the Triumph became blocked following the electrical failure.”

Hmm … well, we guess the editor who was appalled by the thought of being “forced” to “defecate into plastic bags” has never been in a disaster situation where there is no water, toilets or power. And he/she probably has never been camping in the backcountry where you use a bag or just aim for a hole in the ground (and watch out for creepy crawlies, wild critters and poisonous plants when squatting in the wild.)

But anyway … this crappy situation seemed like a great reason to dust off and post some poop tips from our IT’S A DISASTER! book.

Sanitation Facts

The following statistics came from the Water Supply & Sanitation Collaborative Council.

Did you know…

2.6 billion people – or about 40% of the world’s population – do not have access to basic sanitation?!

one gram (0.035 oz) of human feces can contain 10 million viruses, 1 million bacteria, 1,000 parasite cysts, and 100 parasite eggs?!

… more than 5,000 children die every day from diarrhea making it one of the biggest killers of children under five worldwide accounting for 17% of deaths in this age-group.

…sanitation and hygiene could also prevent most of the 130 million annual cases worldwide of serious worm infestation. This matters since worms can divert up to one-third of the food a child consumes, and malnutrition is at the root of 50% of childhood illness.

Sanitation Tips

In disaster situations, plumbing may not be usable due to broken sewer or water lines, flooding, or freezing of the system. To avoid the spread of disease, it is critical that human waste be handled in a sanitary manner!

If toilet okay but lines are not…

If water or sewer lines are damaged but toilet is still intact, you should line the toilet bowl with a plastic bag to collect waste… but DO NOT flush the toilet!! After use, add a small amount of disinfectant to bag, remove and seal bag (with a twist tie if reusing), and place bag in a tightly covered container away from people to reduce smell.

If toilet is unusable…

If toilet is destroyed, a plastic bag in a bucket may be substituted. Some companies make plastic buckets with a seat … or you could use the toilet seat from a commode and lay it on top of a bucket for a more comfortable experience. After use, add a small amount of disinfectant to the bag, and seal or cover bucket. Tip: Placing the bucket inside a plastic crate can help make it more stable.

Disinfectants – easy and effective for home use in Sanitation of Human Waste.

Chlorine Bleach – If water is available, a solution of 1 part liquid household bleach to 10 parts water is best. DO NOT use dry bleach since it can burn you, corrode or dissolve things so not safe for this kind of use.

Calcium hypochlorite – (e.g. HTH, etc.) Available in swimming pool supply or hardware stores and several large discount stores. It can be used in solution by mixing, then storing. Follow directions on the package.

Portable toilet chemicals – These come in both liquid and dry formulas and are available at recreational vehicle (RV) supply stores. Use according to package directions. These chemicals are designed especially for toilets that are not connected to sewer lines.

Powdered, chlorinated lime – Available at some building supply stores. It can be used dry and be sure to get chlorinated lime – not quick lime.

Some other alternatives to use in emergency potties are kitty litter or sawdust. There are also several types of camping toilets and portable toilets that range from fairly low dollars to hundreds of dollars.

Make sure toilet is near the air-exhaust end of the shelter and keep it tightly covered when not in use. Cover with a plastic bag too to keep bugs out and help reduce smell a bit. And consider hanging a sheet or blanket in toilet area for some privacy, if possible.

Also (if possible) consider digging a waste-disposal pit about 3 feet downwind from your shelter if hunkered down for an extended period of time.

Puking may also be an issue during a long-term shelter-in-place situation without power. Nerves, anxiety, a change in diet, and the sight and stench of pee, poop and puke may make others throw up. Having plastic bags, placed throughout a shelter, are the best means to catch puke and keep it off the floor. Buckets, pots, or a newspaper folded into a cone also work.

Some sanitation items for kits…

  • Disinfectant for human waste (see above)
  • Bottles of household chlorine bleach (regular scent)
  • Personal hygiene items (toothbrushes, toothpaste or baking soda, brush, comb, deodorant, shaving cream, razors, etc.)
  • Plastic garbage bags with twist ties and small plastic grocery bags
  • Plastic bucket with tight lid (several would be wise esp. if you can use one for poop and one for pee – see below)
  • Soap, liquid detergent, hand sanitizer (with at least 60% alcohol), moist towelettes or sanitizing wipes, hydrogen peroxide, etc.
  • Toilet paper and baby wipes
  • Paper towels, dish towels, rags, etc.
  • Feminine supplies (tampons, pads, etc.)
  • Diapers (infant, toddler and adult sizes if needed)
  • Disposable gloves
  • Wash cloths, hand and bath towels
  • Small shovel

PHLUSH Twin No Mix poop pee buckets for sanitationPublic Hygiene Lets Us Stay Human, or PHLUSH (an all-volunteer advocacy group based in Portland, Oregon) has a great idea for dealing with sanitation. Use 2 separate buckets (one for pee and one for poop) as explained in their “DIY Christchurch Twin” post.  Or download PHLUSH’s 2-page PDF with more information and instructions about using the 2 bucket system.

Also consider packing all your sanitation items and supplies inside your clean bucket so it’s easy to take with you during an evacuation.

Reduce the spread of germs

Germs and diseases can create major problems and illness in confined quarters so try to reduce the spread of germs and infectious diseases…

  • Wash hands often using soap and water or use hand sanitizer (with at least 60% alcohol in it) to reduce the spread of germs. But keep in mind sanitizers don’t work against some bugs so it’s best to wash up, if possible.

handwashing tips

  • Try to avoid exposure to others’ bodily fluids like blood, pee, poop, spittle, etc.
  • Sick people should cover mouth and nose with tissue or sleeve when coughing or sneezing, wash hands often, and wear a face mask around others (if very ill).
  • Keep cuts and scrapes clean and covered until healed.
  • Clean counters, doorknobs, fixtures, linens, etc. often with a bleach solution.
  • If possible, don’t share silverware, razors, towels, or bedding and wash objects with soap and hot water.

Again these are just some basic things to plan for dealing with human waste and cooties during shelter-in-place situations so there are other items to consider. Add your thoughts or suggestions in the comments below. Stay safe, j & B


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