Home Fire Prevention and Safety Tips (excerpt from our It’s A Disaster! book)

May 18, 2017

Did you know fire kills more Americans every year than all natural disasters combined? At least 80% of all fire deaths occur in residences — and careless smoking is the leading cause of fire deaths. And cooking fires (leaving food unattended or human error) is the leading cause of home fires.

Fire spreads so quickly there is NO time to grab valuables or make a phone call. In just two minutes a fire can become life threatening! In five minutes a house can be engulfed in flames.

A fire’s heat and smoke are more dangerous than the actual flames since you can burn your lungs by inhaling the super-hot air. Fire produces poisonous gases that make you drowsy and disoriented (confused). Instead of being awakened by a fire, you could fall into a deeper sleep.

 

BEFORE A FIRE (FIRE SAFETY TIPS):

Install smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) detectors! – Test alarms 1-4 times a month, replace batteries once a year, and get new units every 10 years.

Make a plan – Create an Escape Plan that includes two escape routes from every room in the house and walk through the routes with your entire family. Also…

  • Make sure your windows are not nailed or painted shut.
  • Make sure security bars on windows have a fire safety opening feature so they can be easily opened from the inside…and teach everyone how to open them!
  • Teach everyone how to stay LOW to floor (air is safer).
  • Pick a spot to meet after escaping fire (meeting place).

Clean up – Keep storage areas clean – don’t stack up newspapers & trash.

Check power sources – Check electrical wiring and extension cords — don’t overload cords or outlets. Make sure there are no exposed wires anywhere and make sure wiring doesn’t touch home insulation.

Use caution – Never use gasoline or similar liquids indoors and never smoke around flammable liquids!

Check heat sources – Check furnaces, stoves, cracked or rusty furnace parts, and chimneys. Always be careful with space heaters and keep them at least 3 feet (1 m) away from flammable materials.

Know how to shut off power – Know where the circuit breaker box and gas valve is and how to turn them off, if necessary. (And always have a gas company rep turn on a main gas line.)

Install A-B-Cs and remember P-A-S-S – Install A-B-C fire extinguishers in the home since they work on all types of fires, and teach family members how to use them. Remember P-A-S-S = Pull the pin; Aim at the base of the fire; Squeeze the trigger; Sweep side to side.

Call local fire – Ask local fire department if they will inspect your home or business for fire safety and prevention.

Teach kids – Explain to children that matches and lighters are TOOLS, not toys… and if they see someone playing with fire they should tell an adult right away! And teach them how to report a fire and when to call 9-1-1.

Prevent common fires – Pay attention when cooking & don’t smoke in bed!

 

DURING A FIRE:

If only a small fire that’s not spreading too fast…

Try to put out…? – Use a fire extinguisher or water (unless it’s an electrical or grease fire) … and never try to put out a fire that’s getting out of control!

  • electrical fire – never use water… use a fire extinguisher approved for electrical fires
  • oil or grease fire in kitchen – smother fire with baking soda or salt (or, if burning in pan or skillet, carefully put a lid over it — but don’t try to carry pan outside!)

If fire is spreading…

GET OUT – DO NOT take time to try to grab anything except your family members! Once outside, do NOT try to go back in (even for pets) – let the firemen do it! Ask a neighbor to call fire department if not already called.

GET DOWN – Stay low to the ground under smoke by crawling on your hands and knees or squat down and walk like a duck… but keep moving to find a way out!

Closed door – Using the back of your hand (not your palm) always feel the top of the door, doorknob, and the crack between the door and door frame before you open a closed door!

  • if door is cool – leave quickly, close door behind you and crawl to an exit
  • if door is hot – DO NOT open it … find another way out

No way out – If you can’t find a way out of the room you’re trapped in (door is hot and too high to jump) then hang a white or light-colored sheet, towel or shirt outside a window to alert firemen.

Use stairs – Never take the elevator during a fire … always use stairs!

If YOU are on fire – If your clothes ever catch fire, STOP what you’re doing, DROP to the ground, cover your face and ROLL until the fire goes out. Running only makes the fire burn faster!

Toxic gas – Plastics in household goods create deadly fumes when burned.

 

AFTER A FIRE:

Don’t go in there – Never enter a fire-damaged building until officials say it’s okay and watch for signs of smoke in case the fire isn’t totally out. Even if a fire’s out, hydrogen cyanide and other toxic fumes can remain.

Utilities – Have an electrician check your household wiring before you turn the power back on and DO NOT try to reconnect any utilities yourself!

Damage – Look for structural damage (roof, walls, floors, etc.) since they may be weak.

Call for help – Local disaster relief service (Red Cross, Salvation Army, etc.) can help provide shelter, food, or personal items that were destroyed.

Insurance – Call your insurance agent or representative and…

  • Keep receipts of all clean-up and repair costs (for both insurance and income taxes).
  • Do not throw away any damaged goods until an official inventory has been taken by your insurance company.

If you rent – Contact your landlord since it is the owner’s responsibility to prevent further loss or damage to the site.

Move your stuff – Secure your personal belongings or move them to another location, if possible.

Above extracted from our IT’S A DISASTER! …and what are YOU gonna do about it? book ~ learn how to order our paperback and/or ebook for 70% to 80% off list

And learn more about fire safety and fire prevention visit the U.S. Fire Administration’s site www.usfa.fema.gov or contact your local fire department, emergency official, or your insurance agent / representative.

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Fedhealth donates portion of all book sales to USFRA to help nation’s first responders

March 11, 2017

Fedhealth, an independent publisher, announced it will be donating a portion of all book orders going forward to support first responders across America.

“We have worked very closely with the United States First Responders Association for years and are committed to help them continue to support our nation’s firefighters, EMTs, law enforcement, active duty military and veterans,” said Fedhealth President and CEO Bill Liebsch. “USFRA’s mission fits perfectly with our “Funding Our Heroes” goals.

Janet Liebsch, Fedhealth Vice President is also Executive Vice President of USFRA and their Disaster Information Specialist. “I have been honored to work with this wonderful organization of professionals and have seen the struggles that first responders deal with financially at their departments, as well as physically, mentally and emotionally in their personal lives. This is a way for us to give back to our country’s heroes through existing and planned USFRA programs and resources.”

Starting this month Fedhealth will donate up to 13% of all bulk IT’S A DISASTER! …and what are YOU gonna do about it? book orders to USFRA with their “Funding Our Heroes” program.

Many disaster education and relief organizations across North America use IT’S A DISASTER! as public education materials for communities before and following a crisis or emergency since the book explains what people should think about and do before, during and after specific types of scenarios, as well as how to administer basic first aid.

The latest version also includes some tips on how to respond during an active shooter incident using data contributed by the Alabama Law Enforcement Agency.

Bill and Janet Liebsch, Fedhealth founders and co-authors and publishers of IT’S A DISASTER!, currently discount their 266-page customizable preparedness and first aid manuals up to 70% off list on 10 copies or more (or only $4.50 U.S. delivered). The deeply discounted price helps families, small businesses, volunteer groups, churches and others get this life-saving data into the hands of their employees, members and loved ones’ hands, plus books can be personalized at no additional charge.

Books can be customized in the print process in larger quantities (1,000 units and up) and an upgrade option offers up to 288 additional pages to be added to the preparedness and first aid manuals so businesses, groups or communities can include local emergency information, advertisements, sponsorship data and more.

And now the founders’ new consulting company, Fedhealth Services Corp, can help manage and facilitate large community-wide book projects and FSC will share advertising revenues with local first responders, chambers and other partners while educating the public and saving them money with discounts and freebies supplied by local and national advertisers. Plus the Liebsches will donate a portion of each bulk order to USFRA going forward in support of their “Funding Our Heroes” program.

For more information visit www.fedhealth.net/funding-our-heroes.html

 

About USFRA

The U.S. First Responders Association (USFRA) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization comprised of a network of colleagues from Law Enforcement, Fire, Rescue, EMS as well as all divisions of the military. USFRA’s goal is to work together to strengthen safety initiatives, develop enhanced training programs and combine efforts to maximize community outreach programs. USFRA is one of the few national nonprofits that embrace all aspects of first response. Long term goals include educational and scholarship programs for youth interested in a career in first response and assistance with displaced veterans. www.usfra.org

 

About Fedhealth

Since 1999 Fedhealth has worked with officials and organizations across North America to get preparedness and safety information out to the public while donating millions in cash and match benefits to First Responders and nonprofit groups. www.fedhealth.net


Merry Christmas from us to you

December 24, 2012

We want to wish everyone a very

Merry Christmas and happy holidays

and we hope you and yours have a safe,

healthy and prosperous 2013..!

Bill & Janet Liebsch
www.fedhealth.net

 


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